The Fashion Folk S01 ep3 : Jesus Del Pozo, Pozo Fashion, [Madrid]

Interview with Jesus Del Pozo

I never had drastic changes in my designs. My collections evolve like my life - one step ahead from the previous one. Every new concept is the result of finessing previous ideas. I was offered to go and design in America but decided against it. Staying in Spain, whilst compromising my financial rewards, allowed me to investigate, and innovate, something the American industry would probably not have allowed me to do.

 

19.24
KM: What is Jesus del Pozo?

19.27
I used to place orders to various artisans I knew, to make my clothes.
Because in those times, these craftsmen could still it could be found in Spain -
And somehow, my designs were discovered by the Spanish fashion press and
that is how I started. I was then asked to put on a fashion show in Paris in
1971.

19.51
KM: When you were there in 71, what did you see? What was it like for a
young Spaniard to go to Paris?

19.56
Well, the difference was another world. My clothes were different to all the
others. They were clothes which were absolutely personal and reflected how I
felt, the things that I wore. Even their construction was different , utilizing
materials that in those times were already out of fashion or never used. The
Fashion newspaper "De Seine" published articles stating that my designs were
a combination of Fantasy and Realism.

20.41
KM: How were you different to what was happening with the other French
designers?

20.46
The avant-garde of fashion actually didn't come from Paris but from London.
There wasn’t a name that stood out but a movement that was growing since
the 60’s. The fashion style of the moment was more classic, very much
conventional, very much for the male, very much for Spain, and outside Spain.
I decided that it didn’t interest me what was for male or female, I just wore
what I liked.

Jewellery Theatre Carravaggio

21.35
I was very encouraged by what I saw in Germany. I remember that one of the
richest times of my life was the time spent in Cologne, because it was a time
where Spain was very reserved. In Germany my eyes were opened to realize
that I wasn’t that "odd", that there were people like me outside Spain.

22.16
In Spain I couldn’t express what I wanted to do because in a way, it was not
approved off, it wasn’t allowed.

22.27
I researched old tailoring and I discovered many of the traditional designs with
Spanish roots. I remember the shepherd’s blanket, the oversized coats, with
Japanese style sleeves. Jackets were softer, and formless, not stiff like the
ones of the 60’s, like the ones from Courrege and Givenchy. They were totally
different.

22.55
I made outfits that were inspired by the bullfighter’s costumes, costumes to
ride motorbikes and old horseriding breeches.

23.12
KM: How do you see yourself as an artist evolving?

 

Jewellery Theatre Carravaggio

23.16
I never had drastic changes in my designs. My collections evolved like my life -
one step ahead from the previous one. Every new concept is the result of
finessing previous ideas. I was offered to go and design in America but
decided against it. Staying in Spain, whilst compromising my financial
rewards, allowed me to investigate, and innovate. Something the American
industry would probably not have allowed me to do.

24.06
KM: What’s your aesthetic philosophy?

24.10
Exactly the same one that I have now. I believe that with the years, time will
agree with me. It is an intimate philosophy. I’m interested in richness from the
inside, not the outside. I’m interested in feeling what I’m wearing, not in what
people see me wearing. I’m not interested in external signals. Of course
fashion can also be the theatre, that's life. We have to be able to change, be
like a chameleon, be explosive, then even I can design "the excess of the
excess or the baroque of the baroque".

25.04
But as a conductor of the thread is my first priority is the what I feel inside.
People always have exteriorised through their clothes - worn their money and
their status.

 

Jewellery Theatre Elements

25.20
I feel sad and sorry for them, but I’m used to it.

25.29
KM: How do you create your clothes? Do you drape them on the mannequin?

25.36
I work a lot on the mannequin. I like to establish a dialog with textiles because
it’s important to have a connection with the specific material to feel where it
wants to go. And sometimes to do the opposite by working against it to obtain
a very different effect.

Jewellery Theatre Fairytales

26.09
KM: As a designer how do you feel about fashion vs. the other design arts?

26.15
Firstly I do a lot of things, not only fashion. Yesterday, I had a debut of an
"Operetta" . The truth is that I thought that it was much more gratifying than
fashion. In the last 20 years, fashion has been a major part of my life, but it is
not my whole life. I have other creative outlets, Set designing and
architecture .

26.58
KM: That’s is your worst moment, what’s your best moment?

27.04
I’ve had very gratifying moments, when my work has been recognized.
In the 90’s I received the Balenciaga Award called "the golden needle" .
Then there was the Gold Medal for "beautiful arts" - a prize of life’s recognition
of working in the arts, from the highest level of culture. The King and the
Queen of Seville presented this to me in 97-98.

OFFICIAL WEBSITE: Jesus Del Pozo, Pozo Fashion, Madrid