The Royal Jewellers S01 ep18 : Francois Paul Journe [Geneva]

Interview with Francois Paul Journe

GENEVA- Francois- Paul Journe - Master Watchmaker and protege of English watchmaker George Daniels.

The first year I presented my collection in Basel, there was just two watches in my collection. In a few days, I met all the important distributors from the whole world. My head was spinning! At 17 when I was working in my uncle’s workshop on antique watches, I was working on watches from the 16th Century, 17th, and 18th Century.All the richness of the watchmakers art of this time was extraordinary, because watchmaking was an avantgarde science and there was an array of incredibly creative people involved at the time. And I was being introduce to the biggest collectors.

Francois Paul Journe
13.48
KM – What is FP Journe?

13.50
FP Journe it is Francois Paul Journe. It is my name, I am of French origin and
I live in Geneva, and have studied clock making since I was 14 years of age.

14.13
I began my career repairing old clocks but shortly after I began to manufacture
watches for collectors.

14.23
This was in the beginning of the eighties.

14.28
These watches were of unique design and precision built to the individual
customer requirements.

14.47
From 1994 I began to design a new collection aimed at a more broader
market.

Jewellery Theatre Carravaggio

14.56
This collection has taken me six years to develop because in my philosophy,
as a professional watchmaker, I make everything, the movement; the
mechanism is entirely made here in our workshop, and assembled.

15.13
Each watchmaker makes his watch piece by piece entirely.

15.24
KM – Why watches, why movements?

15.34
I came to watchmaker school by chance. And when I began watchmaking it
became a passion immediately and this passion is still in me.

15.57
This spirit makes me want to sublime the art of watchmaking.

Jewellery Theatre Carravaggio

16.12
At 17 when I was working in my uncle’s workshop on antique watches, I was
working on watches from the 16th Century, 17th, and 18th Century.

16.28
All the richness of the watchmakers’ art of this time was extraordinary,
because watchmaking was an avant-garde science and there was an array of
incredibly creative people involved.

16.45
And I was being introduced to the biggest collectors.

17.09
The mechanic of a watch has a lot of limitations, the first one is the volume for
a wristwatch, the second limitation is the function. It must be a functional and
useful object.

Jewellery Theatre Elements

17.30
From there on, the more artistic part is the development, the design and all the
aesthetics.

 

17.38
One can design a movement in 10,000 different ways. One can design a face
in 10,000 different ways.

17.50
The art of watchmaking is balancing the aesthetic within the mechanical
constraints.

18.00
KM – Why do your watches look like this?

18.04
Because my name is Jean Paul Journe!

18.07
KM – What is the logic?

18.17
The aesthetics of my watches have a direct cause; the reality of the
mechanical constraints obliges me to express the soul of what is inside.

Jewellery Theatre Fairytales

18.36
For each watch that bears my name, my signature, there is one obligation -
that I always produce something that does not exist yet otherwise I am not
interested.

18.51
KM – How many do you produce every year?

18.57
600 -700 hundred for the whole world, our workshop now has 30 people.

19.08
KM – When you first showed this watch to the industry it must have been a big
reaction.

19.17
The first year I presented my collection in Basel, there was just two watches in
my collection.

19.26
I showed at the Independent Watchmaker Academy.

19.34
And all the important people from the watchmakers industry came by,

19.40
and in a few days, I met all the important distributors from the whole world. My
head was spinning.

19.50
A friend advised me, “Don’t promise anything to anybody, don’t sign any
contracts. Wait for the end of the fair and think about their proposals”.

20.31
KM – What is your influence for the look?

20.38
Traditional watchmaking, especially the 18th century, marine chronometers.

20.55
Normally in a watch there is a mechanism, and then you dress it up. The face
has no relation with the mechanism.

21.17
What I want to achieve is that when somebody looks at my watches, they will
know what’s inside just by looking at the face of the watch.

21.38
The mechanism and the aesthetic have been constructed in parallel, the watch
is holistically true.

OFFICIAL WEBSITE: Francois Paul Journe